Columbus, OH

This submission reflects this organization's contribution to the climate effort, representative of their current actions and commitments as well as the ways in which they intend to step up and collaborate with others.

Columbus, OH's Climate Action Contribution

Climate Action Commitments

Current Climate Actions Columbus, OH Is Taking:

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Partner with other US cities/counties to advocate for national climate policies and take collective action: Climate Mayors

Climate Mayors, founded in 2014, is a bipartisan, peer-to-peer network of over 400 U.S. mayors working together to demonstrate leadership on climate through meaningful actions in their communities, and to express and build political will for effective federal and global policy action.

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Purchase renewable power or build on-site renewable electricity to run local government needs

Powering your own operations with renewable electricity or using local government buildings and land to site solar PV panels is within the decision-making authority of most localities and can be a model to your community.

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Replace fleet vehicles and buses that run on fossil fuels with vehicles that run on electricity

Electric fleet vehicles, especially buses, have a range of benefits that make them an excellent investment for local government use. Cities are coming together to spur innovation amongst manufacturers and use their collective purchasing power to drive down cost.

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Increase energy efficiency of local government operations, such as buildings, street lighting, and water or wastewater plants

Energy efficiency is the best way to save taxpayer money and cut climate pollution right now. The average building wastes about a third of the energy it uses. Consider implementing a strategic energy management plan for all major operations.

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Work with energy utilities to increase renewable energy provided to residents and businesses

Going beyond the local government’s own operations to make renewable energy available to your community is a challenging, but critical step that means working with utilities, state government, and your residents. Clean, renewable bring with them better air, predictable, increasingly lower customer pricing, and local job deployment opportunities.

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Adopt policies that accelerate the transition to electric vehicles for commercial fleets and personal vehicles

Electric vehicles for personal and commercial use are, along with automation, a major trend coming to scale quickly. The proper infrastructure to support EVs will be critical to capture their benefits. Consider partnership with the largest local commercial fleet operators to pilot new ideas.

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Increase rates of walking, cycling and public transit through means accessible to all residents

In many communities, the transportation sector is the largest share of their pollution and getting people to use alternative modes of transit to the personal vehicle comes with a myriad of benefits, not only cutting greenhouse gases.

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Promote practices that reduce the carbon footprint of food procurement and consumption and prevent food waste

Food is often overlooked as a source of greenhouse gas pollution. What it takes to produce, how far is travels to get to consumers and what’s done with food that’s not eaten all lead to major carbon pollution. Producing more food locally, running programs with restaurants and institutions to reduce food waste, and cutting back on carbon intense foods such as meat and poultry are important steps.

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Quantify, track and publicly report my climate action through CDP or carbonn Climate Registry

Disclosure of your climate targets, emissions profile, and actions on a transparent platform is important for accountability to your residents and is increasingly necessary to access tools and financial resources.

Current Climate Actions Report

Areas For Collaboration

We are interested in collaborating on the following:

Efficient Buildings
  • Encouraging more aggressive state energy efficiency policies
  • Improving efficiency in existing buildings through real estate transactions
  • Supporting building thermal decarbonization and electrification

Electric Vehicles
  • Aggregating demand for electric vehicles with other actors
  • Encouraging more aggressive state targets for electric vehicles and GHG standards
  • Promoting increased charging infrastructure

Local Collaboration
  • Collaborate on climate and clean energy action, and to advocate for stronger climate policy at the local level

Utility Sector
  • Aggregating demand for renewable energy with other actors
  • Encouraging more aggressive state renewable energy policies
  • Supporting states, cities, and utilities in decarbonizing their energy supply

Organization details

The City of Columbus is the fifteenth largest city in the nation, is the state capital of Ohio and is located in the center of the state. Columbus has a strong and diverse economy based on education, insurance, banking, fashion, defense, aviation, food, logistics, steel, energy, medical research, health care, hospitality, retail and technology. Under the leadership of Andrew J. Ginther, the City of Columbus was named America’s Opportunity City, and as mayor, Andrew J. Ginther continues to work with labor, business, faith, and community leaders to promote opportunities for every person in every neighborhood. There are approximately 8,500 employees that work for the City of Columbus. There are over 860,000 people residing in the city, which spans over 210 square miles. Columbus is home to The Ohio State University, which has over 60,000 students. Columbus has a number of distinctive neighborhoods, such as the Short North, rich with art galleries, dining, and pubs; Victorian Village which has a number of large ornate Victorian homes; German Village, which is known for its quaint 19th century brick cottages and more. For more information visit www.columbus.gov
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City
Location
www.columbus.gov, OH